FOR SALE: Lizzie Borden’s Home Hits the Market

Have you ever wanted to live in the same house that a psychopathic murderer once called home? If you answered yes, then now’s your chance! Lizzie Borden’s home is for sale, and all that you need to do to make it yours is to relocate to Fall River, Massachusetts and possess an immunity to ghost-axes.

This isn’t THE Lizzie Borden home, mind you. The home that is currently for sale is where she laid her head after being acquitted of the murder of her parents. Built in 1889, it is located about a mile from the home where her parents were brutally killed, a place that has since become a bed and breakfast and museum. After the trial, Borden and her sister, Emma moved into this home on French Street. Borden named the property “Maplecroft” and she lived there until her death in 1927. According to the Boston Globe:

   

The nearly 4,000-square-foot home has eight bedrooms, six fireplaces, and 3.5 bathrooms that have been beautifully restored. It comes fully furnished and has the potential to be turned into a bed-and-breakfast, according to the listing on the Mott and Chace Sotheby’s International Realty website.

Does anyone have $800,000 I can borrow? 

The home has been recently renovated by the current owner, paying special attention to period details and furnishings. All furniture is included in the sale price, which is currently set at $799,000. This is a steep $50,000 reduction in list price, so now may be the time to put in your bids!

Lizzie Borden

Imagine the possibilities for any horror fan and/or any fan of gaudy wallpaper! You could throw some epic seance parties with your guests as you try to summon the spirit of “She who gave forty whacks”. Kim even suggested that we make this the official United States Headquarters of Nightmare on Film Street! No matter who ends up buying the home, they are purchasing a piece of American history and a memento to one of its most macabre chapters.

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Tyler Liston

Purveyor of fine books, films and records by day; Mediocre (but improving) Dad by night.