The Sequel to THE GALLOWS You Didn’t Know Existed

The summer of 2015 brought about Travis Cluff and Chris Lofing’s The Gallows, a horror flick about a group of teenagers that encounter supernatural killer Charlie Grimille and his weapon of choice – a noose. The film capitalized on the Blumhouse magic of cheap production costs translating to big profits. After the dust settled, Gallows brought in over $40 million on a $100,000 budget. Of course, when you do a little simple math : small production costs + massive return = sequels. The profit the movie brought in did not reflect public opinion, however. The Gallows was universally panned by moviegoers. As of today, the film retains a 16% critic and 22% audience score on Rotten Tomatoes. Regardless of audience response, the money it brought back could not be ignored.

According to the movie ticket website 1Iota.comThe Gallows Act II snuck through production and is ready for a special advanced screening. The site indicates they are looking specifically for an audience of 13-25 year old horror fans.  This means they’re likely aiming for a PG-13 rating onto the film. If true, the rating is a departure from the original, which was rated R.

   

The synopsis :

After aspiring actress Auna Rue transfers to a prestigious new school, her desires are twisted by a viral challenge capable of conjuring a malevolent spirit.

The feature adds to a full slate of films for horror fans to explore in the next coming months. Notable names such as It,  Flatliners, and Jigsaw are just a few examples of the packed fall that awaits. On another note, the fact that studios have been able to hide films in plain sight is remarkable. Past releases 10 Cloverfield Lane and Blair Witch were produced under false plots and fake names, escaping any attention. However, in circumstances such as this, it’s fair to ask if it really is a cleverly hidden secret if no one is actually looking.

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Chris V

The horror film that sparked my great love for the genre also permanently scarred my attitude towards hospitals. Over a 100 films later, from suburban Illinois to Antarctica, via a boat to Manhattan or astral projecting to the “Further”, I continue down the dark and stormy path to the next great thrill that awaits!